Historic image of the Latta house before it burned down

Latta University Historic Park


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Site Features & Hours History Rentals Volunteering Membership Artifacts

Located in the historic Oberlin Neighborhood, this two-acre site was home to the Reverend M.L. Latta House and University. The property comprises the remnant land area of Latta University founded in 1892 and the site of the former Latta residence. Unfortunately, the Latta House was destroyed by fire in 2007.

The main image above is courtesy of the State Archives of North Carolina, N.2006.11.121.

 

Contact

 

Josh Ingersoll | 919-996-4361

Historic Resources and Museum Program

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Image courtesy of the State Archives of North Carolina, N.2006.11.121

Site Features & Hours

The Latta University Historic Park is not yet developed as a Park. The next phase of this project is the master plan currently in process.

History

The property comprises the remnant land area of Latta University founded in 1892, and the site of the former Latta residence, destroyed by fire in 2007. The university was an African-American coeducational institution founded by the Reverend Latta, a freed enslaved person, and teacher, to educate underprivileged and orphan children in Raleigh’s Black community.  

In January 2009, an archeological survey began at the site of the former Reverend M.L. Latta House and University. The Raleigh Historic Development Commission (RHDC) worked with City Parks and Recreation staff and Environmental Services, Inc. to complete the archeological survey. On August 4, 2009, the Raleigh City Council accepted the archeological report as presented by the RHDC and the consultant.

The Raleigh Historic Development Commission administered the archeological survey for the City of Raleigh. The investigation was conducted to recover artifacts and data from the Latta House and accessory buildings, additional buildings related to the University, an old well located on the property, and other site features. A comprehensive analysis of the site yielded new information regarding the history and prior land-use of the University and residence. Based on findings, the consultant, Environmental Services, Inc., recommended that the site be redesignated as a Raleigh Historic Landmark.

Read the Archeological Analysis

On July 6, 2010, City Council adopted an ordinance designating the Latta House and University Site as a Raleigh Historic Landmark.

Rentals

This site is not available for rentals, at this time.

 

Volunteering

Volunteers are always needed at our historic sites and museums. The opportunities are open to everyone and volunteers are an essential part of our success! If you are interested in joining us as a volunteer contact Troy Burton or view the volunteer information for the Historic Resources and Museum Program.

Membership

As a member you will help revitalize and preserve North Carolina's history. You will also enjoy cross program perks at the City of Raleigh Museum, The Raleigh Trolley, Mordecai Historic Park, Borden, Tucker, and Pope House Museum.

There are many perks:

  • Free admission to select site and museum events
  • Free admission for select tours
  • Free admission to select lectures
  • Free admission to Mordecai Historic Park
  • Free admission to City of Raleigh Museum
  • 10% gift shop discount at Mordecai and City Museum
  • 10% discount on all site rentals
  • The Raleigh Register Program Newsletter

You can join the COR Museum Friends Group or the Mordecai Square Association; perks convey to each.

Artifacts

The Latta House burned down in 2007. After the Latta House and University Site was deeded to the City of Raleigh in 2009, Parks and Recreation staff and volunteers collected what artifacts remained: bricks, columns, and other objects from the destroyed home. Some of the preserved bricks have fingerprint impressions- suggesting they were handmade. As part of the contract with the City, ESI recovered and recorded a number of artifacts. This collection is currently housed at Mordecai Historic Park.