Raleigh Fire Department (RFD) Thanksgiving Safety


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RFD Cooking Fact Sheet Tip: Activities for Kids During Thanksgiving Contact Information

Note: Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires, followed by Christmas Day and Christmas Eve.The kitchen is the heart The of the home, especially at Thanksgiving. Kids love to be involved in holiday preparations. Safety in the kitchen is important, especially on Thanksgiving Day when there is a lot of activity and people at home.

  • Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking on the stovetop so you can keep an eye on the food. 
  • Stay in the home when cooking your turkey and check on it frequently.
  • Keep children away from the stove. The stove will be hot and kids should stay 3 feet away.
  • Make sure kids stay away from hot food and liquids. The steam or splash from vegetables, gravy or coffee could cause serious burns. 
  • Keep the floor clear so you don’t trip over kids, toys, pocketbooks or bags.
  • Keep knives out of the reach of children.
  • Be sure electric cords from an electric knife, coffee maker, plate warmer or mixer are not dangling off the counter within easy reach of a child.
  • Keep matches and utility lighters out of the reach of children — up high in a locked cabinet.
  • Never leave children alone in room with a lit candle.
  • Make sure your smoke alarms are working. Test them by pushing the test button.

Download: RFD Thanksgiving Safety (PDF)Source: NFPA, Public Education Division, 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169 - Website

RFD Cooking Fact Sheet

Home Fires Involving Cooking Equipment Fact Sheet:In 2010-2014, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 166,100 home* structure fires that involved cooking equipment per year. These fires caused an average of 480 civilian fire deaths, 5,540 civilian fire injuries, and $1.1 billion in direct property damage.U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 455 home cooking fires per day in 2010-2014.

  • Cooking equipment was the leading cause of home structure fires and civilian fire injuries and tied with heating equipment for the second leading cause of home fire deaths.
  • Cooking equipment was involved in
    • Almost half (46%) of all reported home fires,
    • One of every five (19%) home fire deaths,
    • More than two of every five (44%) of reportedhome fire injuries, and
    • 17% of the direct property damage resulting from home fires.
  • Unattended cooking was by far the leading contributing factor in these fires and fire deaths.
  • Clothing was the item first ignited in less than 1% of these fires, but these incidents accounted for 18% of the cooking fire deaths.
  • More than half (55%) of reported non-fatal home cooking fire injuries occurred when the victims tried to fight the fire themselves.
  • Households that use electric ranges have a higher risk of fires and associated losses than those using gas ranges.
  • Ranges or cooktops, with or without ovens, accounted for the majority (62%) of home cooking fire incidents and even larger shares of civilian deaths (88%).
  • Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires, followed by Christmas Day and Christmas Eve.
  •  In a 1999 study of range fires by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, 83% of frying fires began in the first 15 minutes of cooking.

Download: RFD Cooking Fact Sheet (PDF)Source: NFPA, Public Education Division, 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169 - Website

Tip: Activities for Kids During Thanksgiving

 

  • Have activities that keep kids out of the kitchen during this busy time. 
  • Games, puzzles or books can keep them busy. 
  • Kids can get involved in Thanksgiving preparations with recipes that can be done outside the kitchen.
  • Have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried.

Contact Information

Raleigh Fire Department (RFD): FirePrevention@raleighnc.govNFPA, Public Education Division | 1 Batterymarch Park, Quincy, MA 02169 |www.nfpa.org/education

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