international-womens-history

Raleigh Celebrates International Women's History Month

We’re celebrating International Women’s History Month by checking in with some of our elected women leaders. For the first time in history, the Raleigh City Council is majority-female. Here is a bit about where they find inspiration and how they view their new roles. 

Christina Jones, District E

Christina Jones, District E Council Member

“I’m excited to be part of a legacy that celebrates the importance of hearing more points of view. 
         - Christina Jones
                       

Q - What inspires you to be a woman in leadership?        
I am inspired to be a woman in leadership because, historically, there has been a lack of the female perspective. We have so much experience in working with our communities and that’s what we need to see more of in people who are making decisions. It’s been a male-dominated space for so long and now that the tide is beginning to shift, I’m excited to be part of a legacy that celebrates the importance of hearing more points of view.
 

Q – What does your election signal to girls and young women? 
My role in policy making shows young women that their opinions matter. Girls need to see themselves in government roles so that they can aspire to be in that same position. They need to know that they are enough just the way they are and that their views are as important as anyone else’s.

Q - Any words of wisdom about what it means to be a first in history?
Show up. Stand up. Speak up. It’s not the easiest position to be in but having a seat at the table allows us to grow into the city of the future while making space for different perspectives.

Megan Patton, District B

Megan Patton, District B Council Member

“Keep reminding yourself of your deepest values, remind yourself of what brought you to the table in the first place, and remind yourself of your superpowers.”  
           - Megan Patton
     

Q - What inspires you to be a woman in leadership?        
Like so many things in my life, I’ve been inspired by my daughter. I want her to live in a world full of beauty, love, and opportunity; and I’m dedicated to making sure that becomes a reality. I’m also inspired by the women who have led me! From my mom, who went to college in her 30s, to principals, bosses, and civic leaders — they’ve shown me that compassion, empathy, and patience are strengths to be amplified, not weaknesses to be eradicated.

Q – What does your election signal to girls and young women? 
As a first-time elected official who won her seat through a grassroots campaign, I hope that I can demonstrate to young women that they too can affect real change in their community while remaining steadfast in their core beliefs. I want girls — and really anybody — to know that they don’t have to be perfect or “have it all together” to deserve leadership roles. We can all make lasting and positive impacts on our communities without significant wealth, advanced degrees, or any of the other things that have traditionally kept us on the sidelines. Compassion, dedication, and open-mindedness can take you to some pretty cool places.

Q - Any words of wisdom about what it means to be a first in history?
I hardly feel like a “first in history,” but I’d say, stay grounded in your why and surround yourself with people who will help you do that. There will be a lot of pressure to behave or believe or even vote in a particular way based on people’s assumptions. It is easy to get caught up in the noise. Keep reminding yourself of your deepest values, remind yourself of what brought you to the table in the first place, and remind yourself of your superpowers.

Contact

 

equity@raleighnc.gov
919-996-5740

Raleigh Pathways Center
900 S. Wilmington Street
Raleigh, NC 27601

Lead Department:
Equity and Inclusion

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